Floating-point Classification Macros

FP_INFINITE

Floating-point classification type used by fp_classify, for example, indicating the value is infinity.

Include

<math.h>

FP_NAN

Floating-point classification type used by fp_classify, for example, indicating the value is not a number.

Include

<math.h>

FP_NORMAL

Floating-point classification type used by fp_classify, for example, indicating the value is normal, i.e., it is not zero, NaN, infinite, nor subnormal.

Include

<math.h>

FP_SUBNORMAL

Floating-point classification type used by fp_classify, for example, indicating the value is subnormal. Subnormal values are non-zero values, with magnitude smaller than the smallest normal value. The normalisation process shifts leading zeros out of the significand and decreases the exponent, but where this process would cause the exponent to become smaller than its smallest representable value, the leading zeros are permitted and the value becomes subnormal, or denormalised.

Include

<math.h>

FP_ZERO

Floating-point classification type used by fp_classify, for example, indicating the value is zero.

Include

<math.h>

FP_FAST_FMA

The definition of this macro indicates that the fma function executes at least as fast as the discrete multiplication and addition of double values.

Include

<math.h>

FP_FAST_FMAF

The definition of this macro indicates that the fma function executes at least as fast as the discrete multiplication and addition of float values.

Include

<math.h>

FP_FAST_FMAL

The definition of this macro indicates that the fma function executes at least as fast as the discrete multiplication and addition of long double values.

Include

<math.h>

FP_ILOGB0

This macro expands to the value returned by the ilogb function when passed an argument of zero.

Include

<math.h>

Value

Expands to the value of INT_MIN, as defined by <limits.h>

FP_ILOGBNAN

This macro expands to the value returned by the ilogb function when passed an argument of NaN.

Include

<math.h>

Value

Expands to the value of INT_MIN, as defined by <limits.h>